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The Importance of HR for Small Businesses

ImageStarting a new venture is always exciting—you get to dip your toes into something fresh and decide what direction you’ll take to complete the endeavor. When starting your own business, however, multiple aspects must be considered—the culture, mission, values, employee size, procedures, management, etc.—and this is where business owners tend to overlook the importance of a human resources department. Small businesses are pressured to bring in sales in order to keep their doors open, but as more sales are made, workload increases and more employees are needed. This is where HR is crucial. 

With the need for more employees comes the need for proper management training for supervisors. If there is little to no guidance on how to manage employees, the company may be more exposed to liability for illegal employment practices. There needs to be someone who is well versed in current employment laws—if your company continues to move forward and ignores the importance of being in compliance, you run a high risk of getting yourself into legal trouble. And as a small business, a single lawsuit may close your doors for good.

Furthermore, an HR department is needed for talent management purposes. If management only cares about the dollars coming in and disregards their employees’ needs and well-being, there is a great chance these vital employees may leave. Pressure from management to complete work as well as having a large workload may lead to employee burnout. Small businesses need to retain their talent and find ways to keep their employees present—incentives, rewards and recognition are some popular tactics. Management needs to show their employees that all their hard work is much appreciated, therefore a culture that values and balances both work and play may alleviate stress and simultaneously promote productivity and overall morale. All in all, small businesses cannot afford to have a high turnover rate because the longer a seat is vacant, the more money it costs the company…and the more burnt out employees may feel if the extra work load gets dispersed.

For small businesses who cannot afford an HR department, there are outsourcing options. e-VentExe has a special service called eBasicHR which serves as a full HR department. eBasicHR gives business owners access to documents and forms necessary for compliant purposes, as well as unlimited use of an expert HR consultant who will answer and advise any question or issues that may arise.

*e-VentExe is a full service human resource consulting firm specializing in compliance law, recruiting and selection, training and development, and assessment tools. If your company is interested in learning more about eBasicHR or any of the services listed above, please call e-VentExe at 916. 458-5820.

 

Meet the new CALSHRM State Director…

ImageNew Year, new Human Resource leaders. The New Year is a time for embracing change—from simple things such as changing your diet to grandeur aspects such as electing new leaders. None is different for CalSHRM, the California State Council for the Society of Human Resource Management. As a full service human resource consulting company, we live and breathe HR; we take pride in assisting organizations with any of their HR needs, while still maintaining the human connection. With the HR profession growing tremendously as well as technology, what is the outlook for HR in 2014? Michael Letizia, PHR-CA, the new State Director of CalSHRM for 2014 and 2015 shares his insights and goals for CalSHRM and the overall profession.

Having been a member of SHRM since 2000 and serving on the board in various roles until 2013, Michael’s role as State Director is to primarily oversee the functions of the Council and to bring the SHRM affiliates together in the state to solidify initiatives. The Council consists of solely volunteers that Michael will manage, which he deems as a daunting task especially in such a large organization (SHRM is prevalent in California compared to other states).

In terms of goals for CalSHRM, Michael continues to strive for the plans and goals the past President and he created a few years ago, where they envisioned what they believed the California Council should look like. Michael, whose leadership style has always been collaborative, also set some personal goals for himself; he would like volunteers to feel they are part of a larger purpose and that they receive the intrinsic value they sought. One of Michael’s main focus is to ensure the volunteers understand the time, skills, and efforts they put forth into the State are truly making a difference, and that they feel they are part of an organization that is making a difference in California.

Michael hopes to educate California employers and to bring advocacy to businesses and to HR people—professionals and those who are responsible for running HR in their organizations who are not deemed as professionals. Although SHRM caters to HR professionals, Michael believes it is very important that the Council support the individuals who are responsible for HR that may not have the opportunity at this time to call themselves HR professionals.

As such, CalSHRM is partnering with SHRM to be the HR advocate for the employee and the employer. Michael believes education about HR tactics and strategies must be brought to Sacramento to bring the HR voice to the legislature in assisting the government craft ideas that will benefit both California employees and employers.

Michael finds the progression of HR to be very exciting, stating that when he first began his career in the field, he was a Personnel Clerk. Now, as the profession has gained momentum and recognition, HR is being seen as a Strategic Partner and in many companies, a member of the Executive Team. Companies are learning that if they do not direct, assess, and manage their talent, they are not going to achieve the results they hoped. They need people in order to be successful and if they fail to bring in a professional that can help them manage individuals to their fullest potential, then they are not going to get to the place they envisioned. Many Executives are not interested in developing plans for people; they are looking at it from the business perspective. Having that voice at the table talking about human talent to achieve the organization’s goals and the process to make that happen is crucial. Individuals working in HR need to articulate and demonstrate why they are essential to an organization.

Michael stresses that HR individuals and small business owners must be experts in California (and Federal) labor law compliance and understand litigation risks. With California State laws changing at an alarming rate, employers must be updated with compliance and be prepared for consequences if they come; after all, one lawsuit can close a small business.

Advice for individuals currently working in HR is that they must be realistic about the advancements of technology and its impact on society. Michael stresses that California and its employers need to change their views of the traditional work structure in regards to the younger generation entering the workforce: they have to allow workers to be flexible in their schedule in order to reach optimal results. The younger generation is not afraid to say the traditional norm is outdated and antique. Michael praises companies such as Google, who allow their employees to work wherever they can as long as they deliver and meet the company’s expectations. He believes Google and other companies embracing work flexibility are successful because they are managing their talent very strategically. Michael believes that other organizations could reach the same potential if they embrace new ideas and concepts that are shaping our society.

Employee Empowerment: Tips for Keeping Retail Employees Engaged

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The holiday season for retail workers mean one thing: busy, busy, busy.  With stores starting their Black Friday sale on Thanksgiving, more employees are needed to man the store. In fact, CareerBuilder’s Annual Survey concluded that 39% of hiring managers plan to hire workers this year, compared to 36% last year, and 29% in 2011.

Sure, when Black Friday comes along, fashionistas, technology gurus, and anyone who simply wants a good deal will be participating in this shopping spree day. But what about the employees who have to work during these ghastly hours, especially on Thanksgiving? Although store hours are opening in the evening to ensure retail employees have time to spend with their family and friends, it may be tough for any retail manager to motivate their staff (especially if copious amounts of food was consumed just hours before).  How will retail leaders prepare their staff for the infamous Black Friday sale in terms of customer service, team morale, and overall employee well-being?

Working in retail, customer service is essential. As a store associate, necessary steps are taken to achieve top quality service to customers—ask them how their day is going, ask them if they need any assistance finding items, provide insight when asked, be personable and approachable. Yes, folding clothes after what looked like a blizzard hit the section may be frustrating, but remember: providing superior customer service is a pivotal function of the job; not only does it reflect the company, it also reflects the employee.

Staying motivated during the busy season may be challenging, and customer complaints can make it tougher. When team morale seems to be lacking, it is both noticeable for both other staff members and customers. Remember to keep the staff engaged in their work and with their fellow customers by providing incentives such as these:

1)      Provide healthy snacks throughout the day in the break room to ensure employees are being well-nourished. Offering snacks, such as nuts, will reward employees with natural health benefits including long-lasting energy, brain health, and even reduce stress. 

2)      Employee holiday appreciation party. During or after the holiday season, plan a party for the employees to show them they are more than just bodies in the store. Thank them for all the hard work they have done for the company. Gather each employees’ insight (i.e., theme, food, activities) to ensure their voice and ideas are being heard by upper management.

3)      Appreciation in-store discounts or gift cards. Offer employees a generous discount, such as 60% off of sale items and 40% off of regular priced items. Another incentive may involve having a raffle drawing of gift cards to other places.

4)      Shorter shifts to alleviate stress. Dealing with customers amongst the constant hustle and bustle of the season may be demanding. Provide shorter shifts to ensure employees are not feeling burnt-out.

5)      Allow employees to change roles and/or departments during their shift. Employees may feel unmotivated (and most likely bored) repeating one tedious task for the entire shift. Change up the scenery by moving them around the store and allowing them to engage in other roles. This tactic may make the shifts more bearable and the hours go by quicker.

As managers and leaders, it is management’s job to ensure their employees’ needs are being met and frustrations alleviated. Empowering employees in turn empowers management which empowers the overall company.

*e-Ventexe is a full service human resource company dedicated to providing services catered to clients’ needs.

 

The Manager’s Oath, Pt: 1

Amelya Stevenson, SPHR-CA is the owner of e-VentExe, a full service human resource consulting company located in Northern California. Earlier this year, e-VentExe created their own document detailing what it takes to be a superstar manager. Here’s the official video to the first part of the oath!